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Translation Quotes Explained: Anthony Burgess

 

 

Anthony Burgess, the prolific British novelist, composer, librettist, playwright, screenwriter, essayist, travel writer, translator and critic, who is best remembered for his novel “A Clockwork Orange,” once said:

 

“Translation is not a matter of words only: it is a matter of making intelligible a whole culture.”

What we take away from this is that translation goes far beyond the transfer of meaning (never mind the simplistic idea of “switching” words between languages).  In its broadest form, it involves bridging two cultures; in marketing more specifically, it is about making the corporate culture of a business comprehensible to another, culturally-distinct audience that is different from the brand’s intended, original target.

Back to (Beauty) School: New Beauty Terms

New beauty trends are popping up on the Internet daily, making it so hard to keep up! So, let’s try to make sense of some of them…

This week’s beauty term is:

Root Stamping

Mascara makes your lashes thicker and longer. However, there is a trick that could make them appear even fuller — and make your eyes look wider!  This is called root stamping and is the technique of using your mascara wand to gently press or “stamp” the root of your lashes. Stamping at the root flares the lashes upward and makes them look thicker and fuller at the base, for astounding eyes!

Go to thebeautydepartment.com for step-by-step instructions!

Did You Know?

Italian jewelry and The Bulgari connection 2perfume maker Bulgari was one of the first companies to sponsor a fictomercial, the 2001 novel by British writer Fey Weldon entitled “The Bulgari Connection”.

A portmanteau word combining fiction and commercial, a fictomercial is a book, tv show or any other piece of creative writing in which a company pays the writer to incorporate its products into the story. It is part of a trend to use non-traditional ways to promote products and has become a burgeoning business for writers over the last fifteen years.

Why? Because advertisers are always looking to make people see things in different ways. They like to take existing concept in new directions, making up new words along the way (like fictomercial, advertorial, jeggings or masstige).

As a side note, fictomercials are referred to as “publifiction” in French.