Tag Archives: cosmetic translators

Human vs Google Translation

A word of caution against Google Translate!

Technology is a beautiful thing and in business it has become a game-changer: countless apps, widgets, programs and systems are now available to business people to make their work easier and more efficient.

Non-translators tend to spontaneously think of Google Translate when relating technology to translation.

Google Translate’s automatic translations may seem useful because they give internet users a general understanding of something written in a foreign language (e.g. when casually scanning the internet for information).

However, Google Translate should never be relied upon to generate meaningful and printable content.  Not even to make what seems like minor changes to a previously translated text.

To illustrate just how badly it can fail us, we’ve used an example of a text readily available from the French language website of the fashion and cosmetics powerhouse Chanel:

french-language-clippingand its English language version translated by a human:

english-language-clipping

We submitted the original French copy of this text to Google Translate and compared the results to the human translation.

google-translate-clipping

It is quite noteworthy to point out that although the text was very short (50 to 75 words), Google Translate produced three completely nonsensical sentences:

  •  “His escalation of tensions” instead of “Facial tension slips away”;
  •  “Her muslin cotton soaked in warm water gently exfoliates and perfect cleaning” for what should have said “Moistened with warm water, its cotton cloth gently exfoliates and removes all traces of makeup”;
  •  The header “Benefits” was translated by “Earnings”.

Of course, the problems do not end there.  We also have:

  •  a sentence missing a verb,
  •  a whole slew of rather awkwardly strung words,
  •  not to mention the fact that the product name (“Essential Comfort Cleanser”) was translated in two different ways (“Supreme Comfort Cleansing” and “Supreme Cleansing Comfort”).

So please, heed our warning: avoid the temptation of turning to Google Translate for any type of translation, no matter how insignificant. If changes are made to a document we have previously translated, we will be happy to go over them and make the necessary adjustments.

MEET OUR CLIENT: BIOEFFECT

barley

Iceland is hot right now, no question about it!  Seems like everyone we know has recently been to or is about to visit the country’s many natural attractions including glaciers, hot springs, wild horses, puffins, and black sand beaches.bioeffect-egf-serum-bottle

We are pleased to announce that we have worked for Bioeffect, a ground-breaking line of Icelandic cosmetics. Why are these products so special?  They are super effective thanks to a powerful skin-rejuvenating ingredient EGF or Epidermal Growth Factor, heralded by scientists as “the future of anti-aging”.

And although there are a handful of other EGF-based products on the market, the Icelandic EGF used by Bioeffect is different in the way it is produced. Exceptionally pure, it is actually grown inside bio-engineered barley plants that thrive in bacteria-free volcanic ash.

In Iceland, the brand sold 330,000 units of EGF SERUM in its first year, back in 2010. An astounding figure for a country with a population of just 320,000, and even more impressive when you consider that 25 per cent of the population is aged under 12. To this day, 30 per cent of women over 30 here use it. But it isn’t just Icelanders who have been convinced.

Please take a minute to watch this video.  Click on CC in the lower right corner of the video to see the subtitling that Beautyterm has done for this video. Enjoy!

 

What Beauty Brand Names Actually Mean

Make a game of it: try to guess what these beauty brand names actually mean.  Not easy!

Benefit

benefit-640x400

This international favorite started out as a small family venture, when American sisters Jean and Jane Ford created a modest beauty boutique in Indiana in 1976. The boutique, called The Face Place continued to get increasingly popular, attracting worldwide attention. It wasn’t until 1990, when the beauty brand was expanding globally that the sisters decided to come up with a new name. Dreamed up on a flight home from Italy, Jane wanted to incorporate the word ‘Bene’ (Italian for good) into the brand’s new title, and so Benefit was born.

Ciaté

Stands for Colour, Innovation, Aspiration, Trend, and Extraordinary. The acronym is a much better fit on a any label!

Clé De Peau Beauté

A brand that originated in Japan in 1982, Clé de Peau Beauté translates as “the key to beautiful skin.”

GHD

This leading haircare brand has probably the most fun name of all: Good Hair Day.

MAC

First established in a Toronto salon, MAC started off as a make-up-artist-only brand and wasn’t launched to the public until 1984, once it had won over models, editors and photographers alike.  Its meaning is simply Make-Up Artist Cosmetics.

Maybelline

Founded in 1913, Maybelline is named after creator Thomas William’s sister. According to the brand, Maybel used to use petroleum jelly on her lashes and brows. Chemist Williams whipped up some carbon dust to mix with the jelly for a darker shade and increased effect.

Nars

nars

This is the namesake of founder François Nars, who launched his brand in 1995 at Barney’s in New York.

Nivea

Initially set up way back in 1890, Nivea’s name is derived from the Latin ‘nix, nivis’, which means ‘white as snow’ and refers to the company’s first major product, the pure white NIVEA Creme.

Nuxe

NUXE was started in 1989 by French entrepreneur Aliza Jabes and is a combination of the words “Nature” and “Luxury”.

NYX

Nyx (pronounced like ‘nicks’) is named after the Greek goddess of night.

Ouai

If you haven’t heard of this brand yet, you will. The hair-care line, developed by celebrity hairstylist Jen Atkin, hits shelves in 2016 — and its name is a bit of a puzzle. But that’s just the way Atkin likes it. “I wanted you to be at a lunch with your friend, and they mispronounce it and you say, ‘No, it’s Ouai,'” Atkin said at the launch event. (Say it with us now: “WAY.”)

The actual meaning? It comes from the French word “ouais,” which is a casual way of saying “yes,” like “yep” or “yup.” Atkin dropped the “s” to make it look Hawaiian, which reflects her island upbringing. Check back with us in January to see images of the new collection.

 L’Oréal

In 1907, L’Oréal founder Eugène Schueller created the first hair dye formula which he called L’Auréale after a fashionable hairstyle at the time called L’Auréole meaning ‘halo’. The spelling was later changed to the name we know it as today.

OPI

bs_opi_collection3

This catchy brand name is actually the acronym of: Odontorium Products Inc. Not easy to pronounce, right? The brand was originally a dental-equipment company.

Ren

Ren means clean in Swedish.

Rimmel

Launched in 1834 by Eugene Rimmel, this brand was originally set up as a perfumery although its owner started creating make-up products about a year later.  His exploits included the creation of one of the most popular and useful inventions ever: the mascara.

SEPHORA

A publicist for the brand explains that “Sephora” is a combination of the name “Zipporah,” the wife of Moses in the Book of Exodus who was renowned for her exceptional beauty, and “sephosis,” the Greek term attributed to beauty and vanity.

SK-II

The meaning behind the Japanese cult brand’s name is top secret… literally. It stands for ‘Secret Key’ which is what the skincare line was originally going to be called as the scientists were on a quest to find the ‘secret key’ to crystal clear skin. In their research, they found the answer by surprise.

Stila

This name is a derivative of the Italian word “stilare,” which means “to pen,” then A+ to you, friend.

The name comes from the brand’s ethos: “The right makeup can turn even the simplest look into a statement as authentic as your signature.” This eyeliner’s the perfect example.

Urban Decay

urbandecay

Here’s a fun experiment. Google “Urban Decay” and check out the image results.

No, you won’t find swatches of Half Baked shadow. Instead, you’ll likely see a collection of post-apocalyptic crumbling buildings. That’s because “Urban Decay” is actually defined as “the decay and deterioration of an urban area due to neglect or age.” A little weird for a makeup brand, no?

UD agrees, crediting this crazy (and now wildly famous) name to its cofounder Sandy Lerner’s former husband. “Everyone was saying it had to be named ‘Urban’ something. Sandy’s husband, who’s totally ‘Mr. Computer Scientist’ — they invented the router and started Cisco Systems together — just said one day, ‘Oh, why don’t you call it Urban Decay?‘ and the name just stuck,” says cofounder Wende Zomnir.

Wen

When launching the company, the founder took the word “new,” flipped it backwards, and came up with Wen. Plus, he liked that it sounded like “zen.”

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Blast from the Past!

See our Joann in her former life of actress, starring in The Prediction, a 1991 film by Douglas Beer selected for the Rotterdam festival.

MEET OUR CLIENT: Decorté

Saks Fifth Avenue and Japanese skincare leader Kosé Corporation team up to launch a new line of luxury skin care and color products under an exclusive distribution agreement.

Decorté is considered to be one of Asia’s best-kept skin care secrets. The brand combines ancient practices of Eastern medicine and technological innovation to produce revolutionary products based on nature, wisdom and advanced science.

Decorté will be available in Saks locations throughout the US and Canada, as well as on its website, starting in the spring of 2016. Supermodel Kate Moss will be a brand ambassador and the face of Decorté under a long-term partnership.

Kate Moss for Decorte

MEET OUR CLIENT: Nuori, reinventing the concept of freshness in beauty

Beautyterm is proud of its collaboration with Nuori, a new Scandinavian beauty brand hailing from Denmark. Founder Jasmi Bonnen, who previously worked for L’Oréal, has an approach to skincare that borrows from the world of food. She says that fresh is better and more effective:

 ‘We can offer consumers two distinct benefits: higher efficacy of ingredients and purer formulas.’

 icebreaker6

Many natural beauty brands have been in fact eagerly embracing this new philosophy.

The brand makes fresh, small batches of products every 12 weeks. The minimalist line, designed by New York agency NR2154 is stamped with two dates: a start-using-by date and an expiry date. Once products pass their dates, they are removed from the shelves and replaced with a fresh batch.

Jasmi plans to experiment with the freshness theme with a series of limited releases featuring seasonal ingredients.

Click on image to read an interview with Jasmi Bonnen

Click on image to read an interview with Jasmi Bonnen

New and familiar faces from in-cosmetics 2013

Beautyterm attended in-cosmetics 2013 in Paris again and has some pictures to show for it!  Like this one of Innovation Zone, the place for exhibitors to showcase their latest ingredients to visitors.

When it closed its doors last week, in-cosmetics 2013 became the biggest and best attended show to date.

in cosmetics 2013 collage

Who was there:

Our charming clients from Berkem: Myrti’lla, a 100% plant-derived active ingredient from Berkem, was shortlisted for the in-cosmetics Innovation Zone Best Ingredient Award 2013.

The beautiful Imerys exhibit corner manned by a French and British team.  Imerys designs, manufactures and sells mineral-based specialties with applications in a wide range of industries, including personal care.

Naolys, a French company from the Bordeau area, specialized in plant cell culture.  Naolys introduced an innovative plant cell complex, Power Extension [HSB+R], at in-cosmetics 2013.