Tag Archives: beauty and cosmetic translators

MEET OUR CLIENT: Nuori, reinventing the concept of freshness in beauty

Beautyterm is proud of its collaboration with Nuori, a new Scandinavian beauty brand hailing from Denmark. Founder Jasmi Bonnen, who previously worked for L’Oréal, has an approach to skincare that borrows from the world of food. She says that fresh is better and more effective:

 ‘We can offer consumers two distinct benefits: higher efficacy of ingredients and purer formulas.’

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Many natural beauty brands have been in fact eagerly embracing this new philosophy.

The brand makes fresh, small batches of products every 12 weeks. The minimalist line, designed by New York agency NR2154 is stamped with two dates: a start-using-by date and an expiry date. Once products pass their dates, they are removed from the shelves and replaced with a fresh batch.

Jasmi plans to experiment with the freshness theme with a series of limited releases featuring seasonal ingredients.

Click on image to read an interview with Jasmi Bonnen

Click on image to read an interview with Jasmi Bonnen

MEET OUR CLIENT: Fleur de Santé

fleurWith over 35 years delivering specialized skincare products to women of all ages and skin types, Laboratorie Fleur de Santé brings out the ‘Natural Beauty’ in each woman.

Fleur De Santé was founded by Knut Wulff, a prominent beauty expert who began to mix and make skin care products based on natural healing ingredients in the 40’s. Fleur de Santé has developed beauty products based on natural active botanical ingredients for more than 30 years and today offers a wide range of innovative, high quality beauty products, developed to suit women of all ages and skin types.

 

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MEET OUR CLIENT: Opale Laboratoires Monaco

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Opale Laboratoires Monaco offers unique secrets of nature in an exquisite range of skincare products. Designed to promote the lifestyle of Monaco throughout the world and to celebrate women who strive for excellence and authenticity, the Opale collection consists entirely of natural and organic ingredients.

Founders Pierre and Gregory Dewerpe achieved their vision in a purely natural way that brings together beauty, excellence and innovation – with absolutely no synthetic additives, silicone, mineral oils or parabens!

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The Importance of Native Speaking Translators

Why is it so important to hire native speakers as translators?  And why is it almost a twofold obligation when translating beauty care and cosmetic copy?

New translation buyers may not be aware of this, but professional translators work into their native language only.  According to the American Translators Association a “translator who flouts this basic rule is likely to be ignorant of other important quality issues as well”.

If a document needs to be translated into English, it has to be given to native English speakers, and not a French, Spanish or German translator, however skilled a professional he or she may be.  Granted, English has become a global lingua franca or a universal language, but that does not mean that non native speakers, even those who have mastered it orally, will be able to write flawless, print-ready copy.

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Eventually their language-specific reflexes will gain the upper hand and the produced English translation will irrefutably end up peppered with pesky little inconsistencies and erratic expressions.  The end result will be no less than annoying to the intended reader and also potential customer.

A good example from French to English translations involves the very basic word “skin”.  In French, it is frequently used in its plural form to point to many different types of skin.  So the French refer quite naturally to “les peaux matures” et “les peaux sèches et normales”, while in English “skin” must at all times remain in singular.

A non native translator working into English may, however, get carried away and say “With its unique composition, this spring water is capable of soothing even the most irritated skins” or “sensitive skins often age at a faster rate than other skins”, which, to put it mildly, has a skin-crawling (pardon the pun) effect from all points of view.  This is exactly the type of translation faux pas – be it in a website, brochure, product description, press release or other – that raises red flags, tipping your readers off that there just may be something amiss with the broader picture.

Let’s look at the wider ramifications. Cosmetics and beauty care products are designed to bring glamour and luxury to everyday life.  As L’Oréal puts it, they “pamper the soul”, influencing the relationship we have with ourselves, improving our self-acceptance and self-image, and not just the way others perceive us.  Because of the importance of physical appearance in our developed societies, cosmetics enjoy an increasingly higher status.  They represent our striving for excellence, perfection and beauty.  It is therefore essential that they reflect equally high standards of quality.  And hence we see the enormous strategic implications of product branding, image and positioning.

frenchman-200x300As an extension of advertising and marketing communication strategy, translation of cosmetic copy cannot afford to be shabby or substandard.  Even smaller companies just barely on the verge of breaking into international markets should think carefully about spending a little extra on professional translation services, especially for documents used for publication and likely to reach a greater public.

That money will be well spent; it will prove that they care about their products and their customers.  It makes perfect sense.  Why should a customer trust a company that claims to have in-depth scientific expertise but is not able or not willing to advertise it in a way that is on a par with its capabilities?  First impressions are lasting impressions and people make snap judgments on small details.

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Pharmagora 2012 – Paris Expo Porte de Versailles

Pharmagora2APharmagora is a professional tradeshow held annually in Paris and catering to pharmacists and the pharmacy business.  The show’s 400 or so exhibitors are all important partners that pharmacy owners deal with on a daily basis, from laboratories, automated systems suppliers, IT equipment specialists, to orthopedic firms, distributors, merchandising companies and the like.

The trade show takes place at Paris Expo Portes de Versailles, the largest convention center in France.  In 2012, it donned a new layout with 20,000 m2, where exhibitors were divided into three themed sectors, one of which was dermocosmetics. And this is precisely why Pharmagora is a wonderful place to visit for beauty and cosmetics junkies like ourselves.

First and foremost, what are dermocosmetics?  La Roche Posay provides the following definition of dermocosmetics in its beauty glossary:

Dermocosmetic products are applied locally to the skin, scalp and hair. They combine a cosmetic action with a dermatological action. Dermocosmetic products are formulated to maintain the health and beauty of the skin and hair. […]

In addition to La Roche Posay, the most popular brands of French dermocosmetics are Uriage, Vichy, Avène and Biotherm.  But there are also Ducray, Aderma, Galenic, Klorane and many more smaller companies such as Laboratoires Arcana.  They all come to exhibit at Pharmagora because they all target consumers in the habit of buying their skin and hair care products at the pharmacy, with the help and personalized advice of their friendly neighborhood pharmacist.

In fact, that is another big part of the dermocosmetics concept.  Laboratoires Pierre Fabre have even for many years successfully opposed the sale of dermocosmetics over the Internet, arguing in European courts that “only the physical presence of a qualified pharmacist guarantees consumers the quality of pharmaceutical and personalized advice that is tailored to meet their expectations of efficiency and safety” (SOURCE Laboratoires Pierre Fabre).

We should mention that in 2011 in the US, La Roche Posay was present in 6,000 drugstores, either via the pharmacy counter or in dedicated areas, where the brand’s products were promoted by specially trained derma advisors.  Another interesting fact: the dermocosmetics sector has seen strong growth in the recent past in various parts of the world, including Brazil and Poland.